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Recording Techniques
    Over the few years that I've been recording I've used a mixture of live and computer generated sounds. Getting them all to fit together and sound 'right' is a bit task in itself nevermind the writing and playing! The tables below are given as a broad generalization but hopefully should help you should you need them. Please remember there are no hard and fast rules and experimentation can lead to your very own sound.

Equalization

Kick Drum
Boost this frequency and
this is what it boosts
50-100 Hz
Bottom end
100-250 Hz
Roundness
250-800 Hz
Muddiness
5000-8000 Hz
High-end presence
8000-12000 Hz
Hiss

Snare Drum
Boost this frequency and
this is what it boosts
100-250 Hz
Fills the sound out
6000-8000 Hz
Presence

Hi-Hat/Cymbals
Boost this frequency and
this is what it boosts
250-800 Hz
Muddiness
1000-6000 Hz
Presence
6000-8000 Hz
Clarity
8000-12000 Hz
Brightness

Bass Guitar
Boost this frequency and
this is what it boosts
80 Hz
Body/Booming
120-400 Hz
Character
400-800 Hz
Muddiness
800-1000 Hz
Beefs small speakers
1000-6000 Hz
Presence
6000-8000 Hz
High-end presence
8000-12000 Hz
Hiss

Electric Guitar
Boost this frequency and
this is what it boosts
100-250 Hz
Body
250-800 Hz
Muddiness/Roundness
1000-6000 Hz
Edge
6000-8000 Hz
Presence
8000-10000 Hz
Brightness
10000-12000 Hz
Hiss

Acoustic Guitar
Boost this frequency and
this is what it boosts
100-250 Hz
Body/Thicken sound
6000-8000 Hz
Clarity
8000-12000 Hz
Brightness

Strings
Boost this frequency and
this is what it boosts
50-100 Hz
Bottom end
100-250 Hz
Body
250-800 Hz
Muddiness
1000-6000 Hz
Crunchy sound
6000-8000 Hz
Clarity
8000-12000 Hz
Brightness

Wind
Boost this frequency and
this is what it boosts
100-250 Hz
Body
250-800 Hz
Muddiness
800-1000 Hz
Roundness
6000-8000 Hz
Clarity
8000-12000 Hz
Brightness

Compression

General Mixing
Attack
Fast
Release
0.6 sec/auto
Ratio
2:1 to 5:1
Knee
Soft
Gain Reduction
2-9 db(stereo link)

Vocals
Attack
Fast
Release
0.5 sec/auto
Ratio
2:1 to 6:1
Knee
Soft
Gain Reduction
3-9 db

Acoustic Guitar
Attack
5 to 15 ms
Release
0.4 sec/auto
Ratio
5:1 to 9:1
Knee
Soft/Hard
Gain Reduction
5-11 db

Electric Guitar
Attack
2 to 7 ms
Release
0.5 sec/auto
Ratio
9:1
Knee
Hard
Gain Reduction
5-11 db

Kick Drum/Snare Drum
Attack
1 to 5 ms
Release
0.2 sec/auto
Ratio
5:1 to 10:1
Knee
Hard
Gain Reduction
5-15 db

Bass Sounds
Attack
2 to 8 ms
Release
0.4 sec/auto
Ratio
4:1 to 12:1
Knee
Hard
Gain Reduction
5-13 db

Wind Instruments
Attack
1 to 5 ms
Release
0.3 sec/auto
Ratio
6:1 to 15:1
Knee
Hard
Gain Reduction
8-13 db

Effects

Reversed Reverb
     This effect creates a sense of something building up. Whereas when you normally apply reverb it adds to the end of the signal this begins before the signal.
First up, open up your audio editor and find the section to want to effect. Reverse it and then insert some silence at the end of the selected area. If it's in the middle of a audio piece remember how much you've added you may need to alter the length of your file to keep it in time with the rest of the track.
Now add some reverb to your required taste, experiment to find the right settings. Once that's done reverse the audio including the reverb tail and give it a listen.
I find this effect works best on vocals and drum parts although it's suitable for all applications.

Tempo Timestretch
     This effect creates a sound very similar to what was used in Fatboy Slim's Rockafeller Skank. Used on vocals, once loaded into your audio editor select a doppler or timestretch effect(depending on your audio editor) and draw in as many up and down tempo changes across the timeline as you need. Once again experimentation lead different results!

Crunchy Samples
     Use this effect if you like your beat down and dirty. Firstly find the beat sample you want to crunch and load up your audio editor. Now find the option which allows you to change the sample rate. For an old school hip-hop type sound adjust the sample rate to somewhere between 8000 and 12000 samples per second, this adds that distinctive flavour.
Also, try messing about with EQ, increasing the bottom-end for a thumping effect or top-end for a more piercing sound. But take care as mixing too much can cause the sample to eat up headroom when you come to create the full mix of your track. Just a slight change can make all the difference.